Assessment of Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) in Transitional Spaces of a High-Rise Building

Authors

  • Nooriati Taib
  • Zalila Ali

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v1i1.231

Abstract

One passive approach that can significantly reduce energy usage in high-rise buildings is through the creation of non-air conditioned spaces such as transitional spaces. Optimizing passive design would reduce wastage associated with the building’s energy consumption. The study measures the thermal comfort of three types of transitional spaces (sky court, balcony, and rooftop) in a high-rise office building. Based on the assessment of Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET), the outcome showed significant differences in PET in all locations in both wet and dry season. The effectiveness of such area can be improved with the contributions of landscape, maximizing natural ventilation and day lighting where possible.

© 2016. The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies, Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.

Keywords: Thermal comfort; transitional spaces; high-rise; Physiological Equivalent Temperature

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Published

2016-06-26

How to Cite

Taib, N., & Ali, Z. (2016). Assessment of Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) in Transitional Spaces of a High-Rise Building. Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal, 1(1), 348-353. https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v1i1.231