Democratic Street: An application of Space Syntax in testing the spatial justice among women pedestrian

Authors

  • Nurul Shakila Khalid UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MARA SELANGOR
  • Na’asah Nasrudin Centre of Studies for Town and Regional Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Planning and Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Selangor, Malaysia
  • Yusfida Ayu Abdullah Centre of Studies for Town and Regional Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Planning and Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Selangor, Malaysia
  • Ishak Che Abdullah Centre of Studies for Town and Regional Planning, Faculty of Architecture, Planning and Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA Puncak Alam Campus, 42300 Selangor, Malaysia

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v5i13.1967

Keywords:

Democratic Street, Spatial Justice, Women, Space Syntax

Abstract

This research examines the quality of streets and public life among women through observation. Axial analysis models are combined into Space Syntax to hypothesize the effect of grid layout on street vitality and sociability in shopping streets by using global and local integration to measure how women use the space. The result indicated that there is a correlation among these parameters with the following spatial configurative analyses; integrated streets attract more women pedestrians and how women feel as well as they use street space.

Keywords: Democratic Street; Spatial Justice; Women; Space Syntax

eISSN: 2398-4287 © 2020. The Authors. Published for AMER ABRA cE-Bs by e-International Publishing House, Ltd., UK. This is an open-access article under the CC BYNC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/). Peer–review under responsibility of AMER (Association of Malaysian Environment-Behaviour Researchers), ABRA (Association of Behavioural Researchers on Asians) and cE-Bs (Centre for Environment-Behaviour Studies), Faculty of Architecture, Planning & Surveying, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v5i13.1967

Author Biography

Nurul Shakila Khalid, UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MARA SELANGOR

UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MARA SELANGOR
KAMPUS PUNCAK ALAM

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, PLANNING AND SURVEYING

CENTRE OF STUDIES FOR TOWN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
Bandar Puncak Alam, 42300 Selangor, Malaysia.

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Published

2020-04-02

How to Cite

Khalid, N. S., Nasrudin, N., Abdullah, Y. A., & Che Abdullah, I. (2020). Democratic Street: An application of Space Syntax in testing the spatial justice among women pedestrian. Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal, 5(13), 405-414. https://doi.org/10.21834/e-bpj.v5i13.1967